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first block:


A LIFE of opportunity and dignity, free from discrimination and disadvantage, should not be an ideal. It is, in fact, a basic human right – one that we all share in common.

Social justice is about making sure that every Australian - Indigenous and non-Indigenous - has choices about how they live and the means to make those choices.

Social justice is grounded in the practical, day-to-day realities of life. It’s about waking up in a house with running water and proper sanitation; offering one’s children an education that helps them develop their potential and respect their culture. It is the prospect of satisfying employment and good health.

Social justice also means recognising the distinctive rights that Indigenous Australians hold as the original peoples of this land, including:

· the right to a distinct status and culture, which helps maintain and strengthen the identity and spiritual and cultural practices of Indigenous communities

· the right to self-determination, which is a process where Indigenous communities take control of their future and decide how they will address the issues facing them

· the right to land, which provides the spiritual and cultural basis of Indigenous communities.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner advocates for the recognition of the rights of Indigenous Australians and seeks to promote respect and understanding of these rights among the broader Australian community.

For Indigenous peoples to participate in Australian society as equals requires that we be able to live our lives free from assumptions by others about what is best for us. It requires recognition of our values, culture and traditions so that they can co-exist with those of mainstream society. It requires respecting our difference and celebrating it within the diversity of the nation.

Dr William Jonas

History

In the past decade a number of significant events have helped promote a deeper understanding of the issues facing Indigenous Australians.

In 1991 the report of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody revealed a complex and devastating picture of the effects of dispossession, colonisation and institutional racism on Aboriginal peoples.

Partly in response to the findings of the Royal Commission, the federal Parliament established the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation which had as its goal the ‘transformation of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relations in this country’.

This was followed in 1992 by the High Court’s decision in Mabo, which rejected the idea that Australia was terra nullius (‘land belonging to no one’) at the time of European settlement. The Court recognised the common law right of Indigenous peoples to land based on their continuing use and connection to land.

Since then other painful episodes in Australia’s history have been revealed, such as the findings of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their Families.

The position of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner was created by the federal parliament in December 1992 – a response to the findings of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and the National Inquiry into Racist Violence. It was also a response to the extreme social and economic disadvantage faced by Indigenous Australians.

An important role of the Commissioner is to keep Indigenous issues before the federal Government and the Australian community to promote understanding and respect for the rights of Indigenous Australians.

Role and functions

The Social Justice Commissioner works to:

  • advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples
  • promote an Indigenous perspective on different issues
  • build support and understanding for an Indigenous perspective, and
  • empower Indigenous peoples.

A central function of the Commissioner is to report annually to federal Parliament on significant social justice and native title issues facing Indigenous Australians

Social Justice Report

The Social Justice Report looks at the key human rights issues facing Indigenous Australians and makes recommendations about changes to government policies, programs and laws that will help Indigenous Australians more fully enjoy their rights. It covers issues ranging from self-determination to criminal justice and an annual report card on the reconciliation process.

Native Title Report

Under the Native Title Act 1993, the Commissioner is required to make a Native Title Report to federal Parliament each year. Through these reports, the Commissioner gives a human rights perspective on native title issues and advocates for practical co-existence between Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups in using land.

Education and raising awareness

The Commissioner works to raise awareness among Indigenous peoples about their rights. Where appropriate, he joins with other organisations to develop educational initiatives, such as seminars and training programs, and targeted educational resources, such as Tracking your rights and the National Indigenous Legal Advocacy Courses. The Commissioner also seeks to raise awareness about Indigenous issues with the broader Australian community.

International recognition of Indigenous rights

The Commissioner participates in international forums to discuss issues facing Indigenous peoples from around the world. He contributes to reports that Australia is required to submit to United Nations’ committees on human rights issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as making independent submissions to these committees.

Other responsibilities of the Commissioner

The Commissioner also has a responsibility to:

  • review laws and policies and provide advice to the federal, state and territory governments
  • consult with Indigenous and non-Indigenous organisations and Indigenous communities to get their views and expertise on different issues
  • respond to requests for media interviews and speeches to raise Indigenous issues with the Australian community.

As a member of the Australian Human Rights Commission, the Commissioner works closely with others in the organisation to promote and protect the rights of Indigenous Australians. This happens in a variety of ways, such as participating in significant court cases through the Commission’s amicus curie and intervention functions and holding public inquiries into issues of national importance.

The Social Justice Commissioner is not able to receive complaints from individuals. However, the President of the Australian Human Rights Commissionv does have a complaint handling role under anti-discrimination laws.

Major issues

Reconciliation

Reconciliation is based on Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians coming to an honest understanding of our shared history, a commitment to building cooperative partnerships based on trust and respect and a recognition of the distinctive rights of Indigenous peoples.

The formal reconciliation process started in 1991 with the establishment of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation. Ten years later the Council presented the federal Government with a Roadmap to Reconciliation and Final Report to Parliament, which contain a comprehensive set of practical and symbolic steps to be taken.

Whilst community support for reconciliation remains high, the federal Government’s support for ‘practical reconciliation’ – with its primary focus on overcoming Indigenous disadvantage – has meant that important questions about the rights of Indigenous Australians have been left unanswered.

To keep the reconciliation process moving forward, a number of groups, including the Social Justice Commissioner, are working together to set performance ‘benchmarks’ to monitor the responses of governments to the recommendations of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation. The Commissioner also includes a reconciliation ‘progress report’ in his annual Social Justice Report.

It is not possible to talk meaningfully about reconciliation, and the transformation of relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians that it aims for, without reference to human rights …. The treatment of Indigenous peoples throughout Australia’s history has not respected these basic principles of humanity.

Dr William Jonas

Self determination

Self determination is an ‘on going process of choice’ to ensure that Indigenous communities are able to meet their social, cultural and economic needs. It is not about creating a separate Indigenous ‘state’.

The right to self determination is based on the simple acknowledgment that Indigenous peoples are Australia’s first people, recognised by law in the historic Mabo judgement.

The loss of this right to live according to a set of common values and beliefs, and to have that right respected by others, is at the heart of the current disadvantage experienced by Indigenous Australians. Without self-determination it is not possible for Indigenous Australians to fully overcome the legacy of colonisation and dispossession.

In recent years the federal Government has moved away from recognising self determination as the basis of Indigenous policy. The Commissioner continues to challenge this approach and encourages Indigenous communities to seek their own solutions to problems.

Our citizenship rights and our Indigenous rights cannot be separated. We cannot have one without the other.

Professor Lowitja O’Donoghue

Separation of Indigenous children from their families

The landmark 1997 report, Bringing them home, told the stories of many Indigenous children and communities devastated by government policies and laws which allowed Indigenous children to be taken from their families. The report estimated that between one in three and one in ten Indigenous children were forcibly removed from their families between 1910 and 1970.

The report made wide-ranging recommendations, such as the need to provide counselling and other health services, family tracing and reunion services and other means to support Indigenous families and children. The report also called for the establishment of a Sorry Day and a national apology to those affected by separation.

The Commissioner continues to monitor the implementation of the report’s recommendations and works with Indigenous organisations to support families and communities affected by separation policies.

Nothing could have prepared me for the days I spent with my co-commissioners listening as people spoke the truth of their lives for the first time. Of being taken from their mothers at three weeks of age. Of mothers waiting a life time to see their babies’ faces again.

Professor Mick Dodson

Development and Indigenous rights

The Commissioner works with government, industry groups and Indigenous communities to improve the way in which resource development takes place on Indigenous land. He advocates that the rights of Indigenous communities are recognised and respected by resource developers and for a commitment to co-existence and sustainable development. By working in partnership, all parties can share in the benefits of development.

The Commissioner has helped develop a handbook to assist Indigenous communities in land use negotiations. It covers issues such as

  • effective participation in development
  • protection of cultural heritage
  • Indigenous involvement in environmental management
  • respect for Indigenous involvement in decision-making processes

Existing legislative approaches to negotiations are not delivering for Indigenous communities or the environment. A new approach based on respect and cooperation has the potential to deliver many practical benefits in the long run.

Dr William Jonas

second block:

"TAFEs across the state have been told to expect shutdowns, campus mergers, course closures and higher fees under the government's strategy, which will cut subsidies to 80 per cent of vocational courses from next financial year, with a $100m saving for the budget."

  • Russian riot police broke up an Occupy-style protest against President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday, forcing dozens of people out of a central Moscow park where they had staged a week-long sit-in and detaining about 20 people. Protesters then moved to Kudrinskaya Square in Moscow, where they remain encamped.
  • In Chile, a crowd estimated at more than 100,000 marched through the streets of Santiago on Wednesday to support the demands of the nation’s students.
  • Thousands of student protesters flooded the streets in Montreal on Wednesday evening after Quebec Premier Jean Charest announced a proposal for a new ‘emergency law’ in a bid to end the ongoing 14-week-old student uprising and strike.
  • About 2,900 Moroccan judges began a week-long strike to protest against judicial corruption and interference by the executive branch that they say undermines their independence.
  • Two Greenpeace activists were arrested after being pried from a giant iPod in front of Apple’s headquarters Tuesday during a protest against using dirty energy to power data centers.
  • Dozens of Spaniards lined up outside a bank in Madrid on Monday to close their accounts to protest the unfair seizures of homes.
  • Israeli and Palestinian officials announced Monday that more than 1,600 Palestinian prisoners had agreed to end a nearly month-long hunger strike in exchange for concessions by Israel, including a modification to its practice of detention without charge or trial.
  • A three-week-long protest on UC Berkeley agricultural research land in Albany came to a quiet close early Monday when police arrested nine protesters who had set up an urban farming camp.

third block (for cut and paste into a cardboard):


History of Sorry Day

On 26th May 1997 the Report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families was tabled in Federal Parliament. The Bringing Them Home Report, revealed the extent of forced removal policies, which went on for 150 years into the early 1980s. The Report revealed the devastating effects of these policies in terms of spiritual, emotional and physical trauma, as a direct result from the broken connection to traditional land, culture and language, the separation of families and the effect of these on parenting skills. It also revealed the trans-generational impact and damaging effects that these forced child removals continue to have on the Indigenous families and communities today.

The release of the findings of the BTH Report had a profound effect on the Australian public. The Report detailed unquestionable evidence about the forced removal of thousands of Indigenous children from their families and communities. The most shocking finding of the report was that to date, not one Aboriginal family had escaped the effects of the forced removal policies. When the knowledge of these policies became public the National Sorry Day Committee united the Australian public in a grass roots movement that shifted the Nation.

The first Sorry Day was held in Sydney in 1998, it is now commemorated nationally with thousands of Australians from all walks of life participating in memorial services, commemorative meetings, survival celebrations and community gatherings to honour the Stolen Generations.

Sorry Day has helped to keep a focus and the issue of the Stolen Generations on both the political and social agenda with the ensuing results including:

Hundreds and Thousands of non-Indigenous Australians have signed Sorry Books

Many thousands of Australians have attended Sorry Day commemorative events

Over one and half million Australians walked bridges in support of the Stolen Generations and Reconciliation

On Wednesday 13th February the Prime Minister Rudd and the Australian Parliament Said "SORRY" to the Stolen Generations, their families and communities

c

i am pledging my commitment towards reconciliatoin.

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

I felt very sorry for the stolen generations and their family. Recently I read a couple of books about this history, each time my tears rushed out. I think the government did right thing to say sorry to the Indigenous Australians.

c

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

I recognise that as someone who has benefited from living on the Australian lands that were taken unjustly and violently I live with some blood on my hands. In order to wipe some of this away it is my duty to support and actively work towards reconcilliation. I hope that others with whom I share this country recognise their responsibility as beneficiaries of this land and society.

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

I am pledging my commitment towards reconciliation :)

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

On behalf of my family, and their ancestors, I am so sorry for the sadness that you have suffered as a direct result of the hurtful policies of successive governments. I wish for you and your families, healing, peace, resolution and health. I promise to always support your rights to your respective countries and your entitlement to equality and justice.

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

i am pledging my commitment towards roconcilliaition

Friday, 25 May 2012

Louise Sala

To support an ignited & renewed spirit filled with love, strength & belief.

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

I hope that our community members can work together to redress the injustices that continue today.

Do not lose heart, there is a will to make this happen.

Continue the education and the sharing of your rich cultures, including the diverse languages, so that current and future generations have a sense of connection.

Friday, 25 May 2012

c

I will do everything in my power to support those Indigenous Australians who have suffered as a consequence of having their families and traditions eroded by non Indigenous Australians.

Friday, 25 May 2012

y

I give my full pledge of the support towards the 54 recommendations, from the Bringing Them Home Report.I am sorry for the atrocities that the Aboriginal peoples have endured as the Stolen Generation. Sorry is the first step ,now as a nation we must continue to turn from the ways of our past and continue to repair, respect and remember those to whom we are saying Sorry.

Thursday, 24 May 2012

y

I pledge support to the fulfilment of the Bringing Them Home Report. The injustices and atrocities of the past should never be forgotten.

Thursday, 24 May 2012

y

As a english/celtic migrant, I would like to say to all past, present & future generations of Aust Indigenous peoples that I acknowledge Lands in which we live, as Aust Aboriginal peoples Country. I would like to acknowledge & pay respect to all Aboriginal/Indigenous Elders, past, present & future. I acknowledge that Australian Aboriginal peoples never gave up their Lands. I am deeply Sorry for all injustices, atrocities, human rights abuses both past and present. I pledge to continue to learn, to walk & work towards a better future for all Aust Indigenous peoples & their sovereignty of Lands.

Wednesday, 23 May 2012

y

As an English-born migrant I want to say how sorry I am for the injustice and treatment of the aborigine people and the suppression of their culture in the past. I pledge my support for healing, and work towards greater respect for the indigenous people of Australia

Sunday, 20 May 2012

y

I am a proud indigenous woman committed to the healing of our people who were and still are treated with disrespect, in loving memory of my grandmother who along with her sisters were stolen from their loving, hardworworking parents, who never once neglected them. I hereby commit to empowering myself to fight for her injustices and become stronger in my own role as mother to my children.

Thursday, 17 May 2012

y

I am writing as I recognise the atrocities that have taken place and shamefully continue to take place. I am an Australian who is committed to the equality and justice for all Australians and notably our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. We are a signatory of the UNHRC and need to implement full human rights into our practice. I am passionate for equality, equity, empowerment and social justice for all.

Tuesday, 15 May 2012

y

I am deeply sorry for the past injustices inflicted upon Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander people. I pledge my support and commitment to educating the young children in my care about the history of Aborignal people in this country. And work together to support the healing of those injustices.

Friday, 04 May 2012

y

As an indigenous New Zealand woman I would like to pledge to the Aboriginal people, my committment to stand up against any continued injustices in my community that continue racist and oppressive attitudes towards you. I commit to understanding more about the Aboriginal people. I commit to being a positive influence with my new found understanding. Tania

Friday, 04 May 2012

y

Real reconciliation means REAL outcomes which affect the CURRENT position of Indigenous families and communities in our society. Lets work together to eliminate the ongoing political, social and legal barriers we face as a result of practices of current and previous governments.

Wednesday, 02 May 2012

y

I pledge my support, I am truly sorry for the actions of the past. I am working towards a better an equal Australia for all. To the future

y

I am deeply sorry for the horrific injustices that were inflicted on the Australian Aboriginal people.

To see all these outrageous policies went on for so long is really upsetting and disheartening. To hope that humanity will learn from this seems far too little too late.

Wednesday, 11 April 2012

y

I sign here to show my personal and professional commitment to educate our students, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, the history of our Stolen Generation, the socio-cultural and political impact and the steps forward to healing for all of past, present and future.

Thursday, 22 March 2012

y

I am profoundly sorry about the injustice, and heartbreaking abuse that aboriginal people's have endured both in the past and the present due to invasion, occupation, torture, racism and ineffective, controlling policies of our governments past and present. To those who have suffered the consequences of forced removal of children, sorry is simply not enough. It should never have happened. I pledge to do everything I can to educate myself and those I come into contact with about the truth of this country. I pledge my committment do everything possible to support healing and compensation for the stolen generations and all the impacts of injustice to those who hold rightful sovereignty to this land, the aboriginal people's of this land.

Sunday, 05 February 2012

y

http://news-society.ru/ - сайт новостей

Wednesday, 14 December 2011

y

I am pledging my commitment towards reconciliation.

Wednesday, 23 November 2011

y

I support this petition

Wednesday, 23 November 2011

ly

How do you last match Manchester United?

Thursday, 27 October 2011

guest

Stolen generation

it was very sad

Tuesday, 18 October 2011

y

lets build a better future by embracing our mistakes and reaching out to those we have injured along the way - saying sorry is only the begining. to not do so is shameful for any country

Thursday, 13 October 2011

y

Thanks mate... just dropped by. Will look for BIKE STN when we get to Seattle. Still in Buenos Airies.

Wednesday, 10 August 2011

y

This is my pledge to walk beside and behind Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are courageously working to keep their culture alive and to share it with younger generations it was stolen from, along with land, family and dignity.

Friday, 13 May 2011

y

This is my pledge to ensure that this awful chapter is Australia's history is not forgotten.

Wednesday, 11 May 2011

y

Ever since I became aware, many many years ago (after many of ignorance) of the circumstances surrounding European 'settlement' on this land I am committed, in the very least in my heart, to 'righting the wrongs' - if that is possible. There is a long way to go as 'racism' involves both parties - whities thinking they're superior & the indigenes thinking they are inferior. It is a spiritual matter & 'intervening' by governments does not help one bit. The great quote: A situation cannot be changed by the consciousness that created it.

Wednesday, 11 May 2011

y

Sorry Day is a very important day to me that is why I am honored that justice is finally being served and we are being recognized especially our ancestors (:

Friday, 06 May 2011

y

I pledge to do what I can to highlight the unjust policies of our past and those which continue to this day

Thursday, 05 May 2011

x

I am working with Students in 3 High Schools in the West Brisbane area as a Youth Support Co-ordinator and i think it's important for them to understand what Sorry Day is about and how it is linked with the Stolen Generation how much it impacted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

Wednesday, 04 May 2011

x

As a young Aboriginal women, I think that the opportunity given to all Australians to have a say is tremendous. No matter young, old or in between, the courage to stand up tall to something you believe in and encourage others to do the same and this is one thing that all Australians should read and contribute some how.

Friday, 08 April 2011

x

I pledge to support the Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities of Australia in bringing the 54 recommend ations of 'Bringing Them Home' report to fruition before the year 2017

Thursday, 13 January 2011

x

My name is x, and I have recently had the privilege to be accepted into the Carbal Medical Centre as the (Bringing Them Home) Health Worker.

I am a strong and proud Aboriginal from Mitchell QLD; my mob is the GUNGGARI people, and the Yumba is the land outside of Mitchell of which the family is from. It still stands with the old school on the land, and a grounds keeper lives on the land to maintain it.

The experience of being taken from family was traumatic. It delivered loneliness, dislocation, deprivation of affection and love, and created stress and grief. It resulted in deep depression, losses of identity, of culture, of language, of history, of family and of community and caused deep psychological harm and in many cases, mental illness. The stolen generation children were deprived of traditional family life.

I give my full pledge of the support towards the 54 recommendations, from the Bringing Them Home Report.

We are entitled to it.

Thursday, 04 November 2010

x

I pledge my support. It is shameful how your people have been treated in the past.

x.

Tuesday, 14 September 2010

Guest

Ive wanted forever to say sorry on behalf of the white ppl who abused and treated yur ppl so dreadfully.I come under a 'forgotten australian' myself from being in care but the way your people were treated was a whole new level of sadism.Im sorry for what was done,Im sorry for the families,Im sorry for the children,Im sorry for the parents.Im sorry for every man,woman and child who has had to suffer either directly or as a result of intergeneraional issues because of what us white ppl did to you.

It truly does make me ashamed to be white and Ive always felt that because perhaps I identify with some of you as someone who was in care but I know for a fact discrimination based on the color of your skin continues and Im deeply sorry for that.

I dont care wether your Vince Collosimo or one of the street ppl I used to sleep with,you all deserve the same level of care as the system and families you had in place for hundreds of years were shattered by us white ppl in the blink of an eye and each and every one of you are just as important as eachother.

Please keep speaking out.Please let us know of ways we can help even if it's little things like providing books and clothing,typing things up for you,,,,donating canvases or art materials.I dont know exactly what you need but please let us know.

Im also a member if a couple of organizations (sorry,wasnt meaning to bring this up) but one is called Mayumarri or Heal for Life and we're all survivors of abuse or trauma there and are trying our absolute best to meet the needs of indigenous survivors along with all survivors.Im also with the salvo's and right now have amazing young ministers who will do anything they can to reach out.

Please forgive me if Ive got this wrong.I feel like Im treating the indigenous community as a charity case by saying 'we offer this and that' but thats not how I intend to come across.Im just recommending places,especially Mayumarri,who are trying to heal us surviv

Saturday, 07 August 2010

Guest

I am an Aboriginal women and both my fathers parents were part of the stolen generations. My grandfather didn't know his proper last name until he was well into adulthood. We petitioned to have his name changed on his birth certificate to his parents name. My grandmother was taken to a mission in WA away from her father and brothers. We did not know her exact birth date until 2 years before she past away in 2009. This has had a major impact on my family and our culture. It has been hard for us to learn about our families and have completed a lot of research to trace our family back to our roots. It meant a lot to me as an Aboriginal women who is dealing with the intergenerational effects of my grandparents being taken away that the government have finally acknowledged the wrong doing to the Aboriginal people. I am vry pssionate about not letting my family forget what has happened and trying to gain my culture back.

x

Tuesday, 29 June 2010

x

Sorry is not hard to say. Why did it take so long? All 54 recommendations from the Bringing Them Home Report need to be adopted and implemented by the Australian Government, Indigenous Austalians have waited far too long for equality.

Wednesday, 12 May 2010

x

As a white Australian, I am ashamed and appalled at the treatment of the true owners of this land I call home. As far as I am concerned, the word of my ancestors isn't worth the paper the words are written on. The atrocities committed against the Indigenous peoples of this land, are almost unforgiveable; and I would like to do everything in my power to reconcile the relationship between the decendants of the first nation and the decendants of the European visitors to this land (whose ancestors, through their own actions, have resulted in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples being a minority race in their own country). I commit my support to the 54 recommendations arising from the 'Bringing Them Home Report', and urge all others who support this cause to write to your members of Parliament, ministers, and especially the Prime Minister on a constant basis until these recommendations are enacted.

Tuesday, 04 May 2010

x

genocide, segregation, assimulation and reconciliation... 4 policies placed on Indigenous people... You justify your absoulute denial for an apology and hide behind this disclaimer - Policies that were placed on Indigenous people are not reflective or the views of the current governments. The only thing that keeps me going is knowing that you and your ministry are all god fearing Christians...

Thursday, 24 May 2007

x

In the hearts and consciences of ever Australian there exists a gnawing guilt. Deny it or not, deny it at cost to us all, until we say sorry we can never become a nation of justice. I'm sorry for what my ancestors took - the land, the dignity, the children and the lives of indigenous people on this land. From the early years of invasion and first contact up until the present and into the future non-indigenous Australians know in their souls that we had a choice between peaceful and harmonious co-existance or hostile, unjust barbarity towards Aboriginal people. It exists as part of our knowing and part of our story. There is only one way that we as a fair and just democratic nation can begin to move away from that knowledge and that story. Simply say sorry - every single one of us - NO MORE DENIAL!!!!!!!!!

Friday, 25 May 2007

x

I can't imagine the pain and suffering of having a child or children forcibly removed from a loving home never to be seen or heard of again - how many nights of anguish and tears from mothers, fathers and children lost to each other, alone and afraid. I am so sorry this happened. I hope this never happens again, and that one day we will live together with respect, cooperation and compassion.

Tuesday, 16 October 2007

x

I carry racial memories and pride of Scotland and England although my families have been in Australia since the 1850's. I carry racial shame from the 1850's onwards for the wrongs my people have done. I attempt to educate people wherever I can, and I am able to understand when the addicted children of The Stolen Generation come to me for help. I'm proud of that! I commit to making amends wherever possible. I'm Sorry!

Sunday, 02 December 2007

x

i am fully committed to reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians and i will do all i can to inform those who don't know about our past and present issues as i continue to learn of the injustices of past policy and current racist attitudes towards our first australians.i am currently studying these things so i can do my part in the reconciliation process. it takes all of us australians to make a difference. we can all do our part and i am committed to do mine

Wednesday, 09 January 2008

x

I am pleased that the Rudd governemnt has seized this opportunity to finally address the issues surrounding the Stolen Generation. My wish is for all Australians to come together and send a message of hope, understanding and tolerance to Indigenous Australians. I pray this is the start of a new era for all Australians, especially Australians of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds to finally hold their heads up high. I am sorry for what these people have endured in the past through brutal, harsh policies which were instrumental in allowing so much pain and damage. May you all find peace with this ceremony which is but a start towards acknowledgement of all that you have endured. I AM SORRY!

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

c

I am so sorry for the pain and suffering that was inflicted the by the white australians to the stolen generation. the australian goverments apology which is long overdue is a tribute to the families that got ripped apart. sorry.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

c

An this so overdue but my friends and i want say sorry and hope it doesn't happen again.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

We are sorry for the hurt and anguish caused to our Indigenous fellow Austrlians. May our appoligies heal the hurt and allow the people to begin healing, and move forward with this ray of light guiding them.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

I think that it was unjustace and that it shaped Australia's history in to a disater, I think that today we made HISTORY!

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

I'VE EXPERIENCED AUSTRALIAN HISTORY!!! YAY!!!

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

I hope that today we can start to repair some of the hurt and suffering that has been inflicted by these past injustuces. I am sorry that so much pain has been cuased by an institution that has made my world the place it is today. Sorry

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

I hope that today changes the veiw of all Aussies FOREVER!!! xbella

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

today we say sorry for yesterday, so that tomorrow can begin to cure

v

I'm happy this day has finally come as we move on as we say sorry and hopefully the friendlyness between aboriginals and white man will fill to the brim

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

I watched todays apology with my 2 year old daughter and explained to her that if someone gets hurt, even if if it was un-intentional, you say sorry and try to make amends... I want my daughter to grow up proud of being Australian -a rich multi - cultural society and I want her to respect and enjoy everyones differences. But that starts with understanding our past.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

i apoplogise with deapest sympathy. sorry.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

The time has come to put the past where it belongs... in the past. We, as a strong and unified people, can recognise the mistakes of the past. We right these wrongs and move forward towards an Australia that belongs to ALL Australians. For this we strive.

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

By saying sorry we at last show respect to our aboriginal brothers and sisters. What a wonderful day for this country. Now we can start the real work of improving the plight of ALL Australians, every single one!

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

Finally, sorry. But full reparation and compensation are essential to the healing process. The money could be easily found; dispense with the billions in proposed tax cuts and put Australians' monies where our mouths are. an historic day for a new beginning cheers, claudio

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

v

My faith in the government was greatly improved by Kevin's apology. I hope we can all build on what was said this morning.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

v

I support the fulfilment of ALL of the 54 Recommendations of the 'Bringing Them Home Report' and I pledge to act in such ways as to support equality, justice and human rights for Indigenous Australians.

v

I am truly and deeply Sorry.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

v

Here is to fresh hope in rekindling faith and compassion for all those who've suffered unjustly.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

v

I'm white. I'm sorry for the way whites treated IA's. We killed them, we stole their children, we stole their land. Saying sorry does not seem enough.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

I believe that saying sorry is associated with making amends, so it is necessary that the wronged by righted in every way possible. It is not reasonable to say that those who did the wrong had good intentions, if we start with this premise then what are we saying sorry for. I believe that we are saying sorry for recognising that what happened in our nation's history was very unjust, inhumane and deplorable. Thank you.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

I would like to pledge my support and to say how glad I am that our government has finally apologised to Indigenous Australians for the wrongs of the past. I sincerely hope that it brings some comfort to those who were taken from their families and those left behind. I am deeply sorry for all the harm we caused to Aboriginal people.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

sorry for the truly horrific treatment of your ancestors.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

I continue to support indigenous Australians in their great struggle to be heard and supported.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

Finally! We can all heal and grow.

Thursday, 14 February 2008

b

For all the hurt, for the loss and suffering of Aboriginal people from the invasion onwards - I am truly sorry.

Friday, 15 February 2008

b

I think its great the Prime Minister said sorry for the misdeeds of past government and only hope this helps to create a more optimistic future for many Australian Aboriginals.

Friday, 15 February 2008

b

I as an anglosaxon Australian say sorry to all my indigenous brothers and sisters for all the hurt and sadness they have and/or are experiencing as a result of any other Australian including those of any current or past parliaments or governments.

Friday, 15 February 2008

b

I pledge that I am sorry. I am sorry for social welfare, I am sorry for free education, I am sorry for cheap healthcare, I am sorry for cheap housing, I am sorry for abstudy I am just so sorry.

Saturday, 16 February 2008

b

A very important time in our history! Looking forward to the journey ahead in unity. r e a

Sunday, 17 February 2008

b

I felt that the speech was such a wonderful moment and at last - at last - I felt as though we had someone actually leading the country and representing me and all the people like me who do genuinely feel a great deal of sorrow about all the unjust and downright outragous things that have been done to Aboriginal peoples over the years.

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